The Association Between Hair Relaxers and Fibroids

“There may be a link between hair relaxers to uterine fibroids, as well as early puberty in young girls.

Scientists followed more than 23,000 pre-menopausal Black American women from 1997 to 2009 and found that the two- to three-times higher rate of fibroids among black women may be linked to chemical exposure through scalp lesions and burns resulting from relaxers.

Women who got their first menstrual period before the age of 10 were also more likely to have uterine fibroids, and early menstruation may result from hair products black girls are using, according to a separate study published in the Annals of Epidemiology last summer.”

This is a snippet of an article I found on blackdoctor.org and here’s the link to that article: Association Of Fibroids & Relaxers

 


First, let me start off by defining what uterine fibroids are. Uterine fibroids are noncancerous tumors that develop in the uterus, a female reproductive organ. Fibroids can range in size – anywhere from the size of a pea to a melon. Fibroids have become more prevalent in the Black Community among young females. This is an alarming statistic because there are only 3 main ways to surgically remove fibroids, and one of those surgical procedures – Hystorectomy – involves the removal of a woman’s uterus inhibiting her from having kids later in the future. Now if you already have 5 kids, this may not bother you, but when teenagers lose the ability to have children because of a relaxer – something not thought of as harmful – that is a problem!

One alarming thing that I learned from this article is that the hair industry isn’t monitored or regulated by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration). This means that no one is determining how harmful the chemicals we put in our hair are and the effects they’ll have on us in the long run.

Good news, on the other hand, is that their is not a direct distinguished correlation between relaxers and fibroids. Researchers say that they have to research more to be able to tell if it’s a direct cause and effect matter.

 

 

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Moriah Banks

Moriah Banks, Intern for CurlyInCollege, is a college freshman at North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University. She’s known for her involvement in her community, and her love for natural hair. In her spare time she travels the country and spends quality time with her loved ones. To see more of Moriah, follow her on Twitter and Instagram under the username moriahashleyy, or on her personal blog at moriahashleyy.wordpress.com.

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